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C.S. Lewis

C.S. Lewis
The task of the modern educator is not to cut down jungles, but to irrigate deserts.
The surest way of spoiling a pleasure is to start examining your satisfaction.
You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.
A man can no more diminish God's glory by refusing to worship Him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling the word, 'darkness' on the walls of his cell.
Human beings, all over the earth, have this curious idea that they ought to behave in a certain way, and can't really get rid of it.
It still remains true that no justification of virtue will enable a man to be virtuous.
When you are arguing against Him you are arguing against the very power that makes you able to argue at all.
We have a strange illusion that mere time cancels sin. But mere time does nothing either to the fact or to the guilt of a sin.
If the solar system was brought about by an accidental collision, then the appearance of organic life on this planet was also an accident, and the whole evolution of Man was an accident too. If so, then all our present thoughts are mere accidents - the accidental by-product of the movement of atoms. And this holds for the thoughts of the materialists and astronomers as well as for anyone else's. But if their thoughts - i.e., of Materialism and Astronomy - are merely accidental by-products, why should we believe them to be true? I see no reason for believing that one accident should be able to give me a correct account of all the other accidents. It's like expecting that the accidental shape taken by the splash when you upset a milk-jug should give you a correct account of how the jug was made and why it was upset.
There will be two kinds of people in the end: Those that will say to God 'Thy will be done' and those to whom God will say 'Thy will be done.'
The Moral Law tells us the tune we have to play: our instincts are merely the keys.
Eros will have naked bodies; Friendship naked personalities.
God is not proud...He will have us even though we have shown that we prefer everything else to Him.
If one is only to talk from first-hand experience, conversation would be a very poor business.
Morality, like numinous awe, is a jump; in it, man goes beyond anything that can be 'given' in the facts of experience.
Everything except God has some natural superior; everything except unformed matter has some natural inferior.
Mortal lovers must not try to remain at the first step; for lasting passion is the dream of a harlot and from it we wake in despair.
God cannot give us a happiness and peace apart from Himself, because it is not there. There is no such thing.
Love is not affectionate feeling, but a steady wish for the loved person's ultimate good as far as it can be obtained.
If these holy places, things, and days cease to remind us, if they obliterate our awareness that all ground is holy and every bush (could we but perceive it) a Burning Bush, then the hallows begin to do harm. Hence both the necessity, and the perennial danger, of 'religion.'